Just for Parents

Need some advice when things aren’t going as expected? Want to share a potty training tip with other parents? This is the place to be! Choose from the four categories below and find all you need to know.

  • Essential Tools for Potty Training

    Essential Tools for Potty Training

    Former Pull-Ups® Potty Training Partner and stay-at-home mom, Julie Anaya, offers real-life insights about creating an effective system for potty training. We talked with her about toilet training and the steps she took to ensure her toddler felt like a Big Kid.

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  • All About Potty Seats

    All About Potty Seats

    It’s all about independence. That’s the word on potty seats from family practitioner and parenting expert Dr. Jody McVittie. Read about expert advice to help boost your child’s independence and create a casual attitude when they are using the bathroom.

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  • How to Dress for Success

    How to Dress for Success

    For children who are in diapers full time, cute toddler outfits are just fine, but when a child begins potty training, it’s time to put them in the back of the closet or give them to the local thrift shop. When it comes to potty training, simple and easy-to-use clothes outrank cute and adorable.

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  • Steps to Overnight Success

    Steps to Overnight Success

    Your child may be a pro at staying dry during the day, but nighttime can be a different task altogether. Don’t get discouraged though, because nighttime is typically the part of the day that takes the longest for a child to master. But a little planning and patience can make it much easier for your tot to succeed.

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  • Reward Ideas for Your Big Kid

    Reward Ideas for Your Big Kid

    Have you ever rewarded yourself for a job well done? Maybe you bought your coffee instead of making it. Or maybe you enjoyed a half-hour in the bathtub with no interruptions (or rubber ducks floating around next to you). Children need rewards too, especially during training, and a little reward can go a long way to make them feel special.

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  • Potty Training on the Go: Top Tips for Potty Training Outside the Home

    Potty Training on the Go: Top Tips for Potty Training Outside the Home

    Making sure your child is comfortable is an essential step while training on the go. Here we have several moms sharing tips about training on the road, in public bathrooms, and remembering to stay patient and calm during the process.

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How to Dress for Success

How to Dress for Success

by Sue Marquette Poremba

For children who are in diapers full time, cute toddler outfits are just fine, but when a child begins potty training, it’s time to put them in the back of the closet or give them to the local thrift shop. When it comes to potty training, simple and easy-to-use clothes outrank cute and adorable.

Go Against Fashion Trends

Parents quickly learn that while it might be nice for their child to be the fashionable kid in the neighborhood, most of these clothes aren’t practical. The best clothes a child can wear during the potty training process are the ones that are easiest to take off quickly. Many parents and experts suggest that little girls wear dresses, and in cooler weather, sweat pants are a favorite choice for potty training children.

“Kids tend to wait until the last minute to go to the potty,” says Cindy Buchanan of Columbian, Ala., a mother of two. “If they have a lot of trouble getting the hooks and latches and buttons on overalls undone they will wet themselves before they get it all taken off.” Even her daughter, who is in first grade, refuses to wear overalls or any outfit that is too complicated to take off quickly.

If It Is Easy, They Will Go

Children of all ages should be encouraged to pee between eight and 10 times a day, says MiChelle Passamaneck, a pediatric and urology nurse practitioner at the University of Colorado Denver Health Services Center. “However, most children think using the bathroom is a waste of time,” she says. “The harder it is for them to take off their clothes, the harder it is to get them to use the bathroom on their own.” Furthermore, according to Passamaneck, infrequent urination or “holding it” for long periods of time can lead to bladder or kidney problems.

Children should wear clothes that can be easily dropped to the ankles or kicked off completely so the knees can be spread apart, which makes peeing much easier and more comfortable, says Passamaneck. “Tights and leggings are the hardest to get off, and little girls rarely push them down far enough when going to the bathroom,” she adds.

Tips for Dressing

Keep these tips in mind when dressing your child for potty training success:

  • Less is best. “When I [worked on potty training with] my twin girls, it was best accomplished by wearing nothing for several hours in the morning,” says Tracy Rasmussen of Pottsville, Penn. Buchanan agrees. “If we’re at home and no one is there or coming over, the kids can run around in their T-shirts and undies. When they are first learning, you know they are going to have accidents, so that is only one little garment to change.”
  • Gradually expand the time wearing underwear. “As your child becomes more confident and comfortable wearing undies, add additional practice time until your child is wearing them all day,” says Dr. Eileen Kennedy-Moore, a psychologist and mother of four.
  • Pick long pants over shorts. Jennifer Koons, a Roswell, Ga., mother of two, recommends dressing your child in long pants. “When accidents happen, the long pants absorb more and save your carpets and furniture.”
  • Take advantage of warm weather. It is easier for both the child and parent when there are fewer clothes involved.
  • Take a test run. Parents shouldn’t assume their child knows how to put on or take off pants. With each new outfit, there should be practice time. Children will be more willing to go to the potty if they are confident they can undress with confidence.
  • Dress for the occasion. Letting your children run around the house naked or in minimal stages of dress is fine if you are at home alone. At daycare or when visiting friends, children should wear elastic band pants or dresses.
  • Be prepared. Accidents will happen, so be prepared. Keep one or two extra outfits and a stash of Pull-Ups® Training Pants in the car.
  • Don’t forget nighttime. Potty training doesn’t end when bedtime comes. The same general rules should apply to nighttime wear: think nightgowns, two-piece pajamas with elastic bands, t-shirts or Pull-Ups® Night*Time Training Pants.